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  3. I don't know how to access my Chanel mixer class I have just purchased .
  4. Last week
  5. Ok, so let's ignore the old screen then. Let's just concentrate on the new screen. Can you describe what is the problem, exactly? In what way does the calibrated screen differ from your prints?
  6. No, Much more detail is being shown with my new computer and monitor. I really think this new monitor which is 9 years newer than my old one has something to do with that (technology).
  7. https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=2315074555270701&set=pcb.2752888678107261&type=3&theater&ifg=1
  8. https://www.facebook.com/djeirana/?eid=ARCXTHQUmkH5VyrdWY2YZHDIGmH8_83MKeW53JtSkDEgMdkEbFr07n6Y2BtG9ou8YgObp3Q_twN4RuTU&timeline_context_item_type=intro_card_work&timeline_context_item_source=100003045377164&fref=tag
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  10. First of all, the difference between the Eizo and my older NEC is very noticeable when viewing picture edited with the NEC. My older pictures look much different! Is it an entirely new computer system, or have you only replaced the screen? This is an entirely new computer system. The computer is custom made by a very reputable company that was referred to me by my cousin who has been a professional photographer for 40+ years, and he’s been using them for years for all his computer needs. How are you judging this, exactly? When I pull up pictures edited on the old screen onto the new screen, they look very different. I would think this has to do with better technology in these new monitors…better coverage of the sRGB color space. What calibrator did you use for your old screen? I used the Spyder Elite 3, version 4 software I believe. I think this Eizo came with the Spyder 5 Express, but I know it is a version of the Spyder family. (NOTE: The Eizo support agent said that he X-Rite i1 Display may give slightly better results.) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1) What would happen if the contrast ratio was above or below 600:1? (800:1 / 400:1) Even 600:1 is too high in my opinion. 400:1 is better. Basically, the higher the contrast ratio, the further away from print matching you'll be. And I guess it goes without saying that print matching is the goal of calibration. On that subject, which pro lab are your prints from? And how many prints do you have? I’ve been using Bay Photo for years, but they have become less than helpful with my issue. In years past they had a technician who was extremely helpful, but he is no longer with them. I’ve already talked to Black River Imaging, and may give them a try. I’m not saying I am going to switch, but that is on my mind at this point in time. I will send evaluation prints out to both companies. After talking to Black River Imaging yesterday, I was impressed with their top technician. A thought and question. Correct me if I am wrong with my thinking! If a 1:1 Contrast Ratio is given, you would have Pure White (ffffff) & Pure Black (000000). If this is correct wouldn’t a higher Contrast Ratio be better as long as you don’t go above the rating of the monitor? I’m also thinking that too high of a ratio could possibly go beyond a printing company’s capability. Am I correct; if not could you explain further! I’d like to understand this a bit more. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2) If the darker areas of my evaluation prints come back too dark, would it be best to think about raising or lowering the contrast ratio? (Their ColorNavigator7 software has a black level control.) The purpose of calibration is to make your screen match your prints. It doesn't matter if you don't like the prints, your screen still has to match them. So, if the blacks on screen are lighter than the blacks in print, you need to darken the blacks on screen. However, I urge you to take your light into consideration. Have you read this? Yes, I have. I’ve brightened up the room a bit to where the monitor isn’t overpowering the other lighting in the room. In addition, there is not glare on screen. Thank you, Julius Titak
  11. The email address you've used for your membership of this forum is different from the email address you listed when you signed up. Are both addresses still valid?
  12. I am sorry Damien. Soon after I wrote the post asking for info I received the email with instructions. I guess I was just over anxious to get started. Looking forward to taking all of your classes!
  13. Hi Julius, How are you judging this, exactly? What calibrator did you use for your old screen? Is it an entirely new computer system, or have you only replaced the screen? Even 600:1 is too high in my opinion. 400:1 is better. Basically, the higher the contrast ratio, the further away from print matching you'll be. And I guess it goes without saying that print matching is the goal of calibration. On that subject, which pro lab are your prints from? And how many prints do you have? The purpose of calibration is to make your screen match your prints. It doesn't matter if you don't like the prints, your screen still has to match them. So if the blacks on screen are lighter than the blacks in print, you need to darken the blacks on screen. However, I urge you to take your light into consideration. Have you read this? I'm so sorry, I haven't used CN since version 4.
  14. I just purchased the Bridge Class. How do I access the class? I received a confirmation email that my payment had been accepted but not a link to the class.
  15. I'm in the process of calibrating my new Eizo CS2420, and I have a few questions. First of all the difference between the Eizo and my older NEC is very noticeable when viewing picture edited with the NEC. My older pictures look much different! Talking with the support people at Eizo, they say that the Contrast Ratio should be around 600:1 for this monitor. Questions: 1) What would happen if the contrast ratio was above or below 600:1? (800:1 / 400:1) 2) If the darker areas of my evaluation prints come back too dark, would it be best to think about raising or lowering the contrast ratio? (Their ColorNavigator7 software has a black level control.) 3) The hardware doing the calibrating is their EX3 which is the equivalent to the Spyder 3 Express I think (Express - 95% sure). The program looks nothing like the Spyder programs interface. 4) Have you had any experience with Eizo, ColorNavigator7 software that would prove beneficial? 5) Is there anything else you'd like to add? I've read through a lot of you articles, and I thank you for making them available to us! Thank you, Julius Titak
  16. Okay thank you and okay..I will get to that class! Hopefully soon!
  17. You'll need to include the flatting in your action, to be safe. Sorry, I can't answer that here. That information is part of the Sharpening Class.
  18. Another question.. sorry if I seem daft to you, but this is all new to me and I wanna get it right. Should my sharpening be higher when it's going to the client verses just sharpening for social media? (It goes on an online gallery where they can downloaded...so still on the web, but it's next step is straight to the client.)
  19. So if I make a simple sharpening action can I start it with flattening image or does the image processor flatten it for you?
  20. Definitely don't do it manually. Put it in Image Processor as usual.
  21. Have you watched the video? If sharpening is required, you'll need to make a simple action to do the sharpening, then include it in Image Processor.
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