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Elizabeth G

Best Practices for LR Export

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I just got Adobe CC so I am testing Lightroom for certain editing tasks. I am a loyal Damien follower and don't know that I'll switch entirely over to LR for editing (I see what he means about the lackluster highlight clipping warnings). However, for photos I do edit in LR, I am wondering what the best practices are for export settings. What should the quality setting be (100, or something else) and should I enter anything into the image sizing section?

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Lightroom is no different from Photoshop in this regard.  Your export or save settings are entirely dependent on the purpose for which you're creating the file.  You never "just export a file".  It always must have a specific purpose.

So, what is the purpose of the files you wish to export today?

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8 minutes ago, Damien Symonds said:

Lightroom is no different from Photoshop in this regard.  Your export or save settings are entirely dependent on the purpose for which you're creating the file.  You never "just export a file".  It always must have a specific purpose.

So, what is the purpose of the files you wish to export today?

Hi Damien, I want to export some files to send digitally. These are just personal photos so I thought I'd play around with LR for this purpose. Typically when I edit in Photoshop I just do my edits in ACR and then run image processor to save the file as a JPG at a Quality level of 10. I don't change anything as far as pixel dimensions or resolution unless I'm preparing the file for print. When I am preparing a file for printing I follow your print sharpening class instructions. I haven't yet done my full set of test prints though so I've not go access to the bonus module yet.

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1 minute ago, Elizabeth G said:

I haven't yet done my full set of test prints though so I've not go access to the bonus module yet.

Please hurry.  You'll kick yourself over any images you send to people without that knowledge.

2 minutes ago, Elizabeth G said:

I don't change anything as far as pixel dimensions or resolution

No, this is really bad.  Please read this again.

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1 minute ago, Damien Symonds said:

Please hurry.  You'll kick yourself over any images you send to people without that knowledge.

No, this is really bad.  Please read this again.

I read the post at that link again. Are you saying it's bad because I'm not doing the 11x15 ratio on all the images, or am I missing the point? Or, is it bad to run image processor versus opening each individual .psd file and then "saving as a .jpg" into a folder with the edited images. I think I'm missing something of key importance.

 

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1 minute ago, Damien Symonds said:

The 11:15 thing.

Ok. Thank you for the clarification. If I crop to 11:15 and then want to export from LR, do I set the quality to 100, or lower (does it even matter?). Should I still leave resolution blank since it doesn't really matter when not preparing a file for print, right? I'm probably going to crawl back to Photoshop for these photos at the end of the day...

I'm hoping to do the test prints soon. I know I need the info in that bonus module. :)

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Just now, Damien Symonds said:

100 is definitely too high.  70 is fine.

Thank you so much! I really appreciate the help and I will get to those test prints ASAP! Even though I haven't done the homework for the bonus module, I've been using the print sharpening class info for client print orders and my clients are always blown away at how amazing the prints look. It's a huge difference from before I took the print sharpening class.

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FYI: 80% in LR is equal to "10" in PS.

100% in LR is equal to "12" in PS. Adobe's ratings are based on a 1 --> 12 method. "11" in PS would be "90%" in LR, "9" would be "70%,"  and so on.

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On 2/19/2017 at 2:24 PM, Brian said:

FYI: 80% in LR is equal to "10" in PS.

100% in LR is equal to "12" in PS. Adobe's ratings are based on a 1 --> 12 method. "11" in PS would be "90%" in LR, "9" would be "70%,"  and so on.

Thank you!

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