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Need new PC, Need recommendations running CC2018


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Hi Brian,

I've upgraded to CC2018 version this weekend and my already slow computer is now running at a snails pace and driving me nuts. I think it's time for an upgrade. I need a new PC and would like recommendations on what to get. I basically run ACR and PS on CC2018 for editing and check my mail, FB and upload my pictures to Smugmug for client galleries. This is my main use for this PC. I do a lot of editing and need to speed things up I don't have a lot of time to edit anymore and now it's even worse. Please help me find something. I'm not sure I want Dell though I read through some earlier threads and most of the recommendations are Dell. Just curious why?

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First, what is your budget? 

The reason I recommend Dell is that it's easy. If you don't like Dell, that's fine, just find a similar specs on another brand. 

Basically, you are looking for a low-end gaming machine. 

i7 CPU - Fastest you can afford

16GB RAM / 32GB Preferred 

A separate non-integrated video card, with its own video memory. 2GB - 4GB Video RAM, 6GB - 8GB preferred. The reason is Adobe's products rely on the video card for a performance boost. So if you want PS to run faster, get a beefy video card. It's not just the CPU that determines speed these days. 

1TB Primary HD. Bigger is always better. Do NOT be fooled by a 256GB SSD drive, even though it's faster, it won't do you any good if its full. As Windows downloads it's new version, it downloads a whole other OS and puts your current OS in a Windows.old folder. In addition, the thing that can can help you when things go wrong, restore points are turned off by default on a smaller drive. If you do get a SSD drive as a primary drive, make sure it's AT LEAST 500GB.  

Windows 10 Home. I like Windows 10 Pro myself, though I'm more of a power user. 

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So  I found this post from last year would your recommendations still apply or is there something better out there now that I should get?  I don't have a budget really but lets say $2000 and under (Canadian). 

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The post above yours still applies.
 

  • Intel i7 CPU
  • 16GB RAM or more
  • 1TB HD or more
  • A video card that has its own dedicated video memory. 2GB - 4GB is fine.
  • Plenty of USB 3.0 Ports
  • I like Windows 10 Pro, but I'm a power user.

Don't worry so much about the new Intel i9 CPU chips that have just been released. Photoshop really doesn't pay attention to the stuff that makes a i9 so fast. In fact, there is only about a 5-7% performance boost between a i5 and i7 CPU. Why do I recommend a i7 then? I build my computers with a 5-7 year time-frame in mind. While an i5 will be "fine" for the average user, and those who can't afford the $200 difference, I feel a i7 might be better in the long run, especially if you hold onto your computers around 7 years or so, like me. 

WHATEVER YOU DO, DO NOT GET SUCKERED INTO A 256GB SSD (MAIN) HD. Pay attention to those fine details in the technical specifications.

 

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Brian what do you think of this one? https://www.bestbuy.ca/en-ca/product/alienware-aurora-desktop-pc-intel-i7-8700-1tb-hdd-16gb-ram-nvidia-geforce-gtx-1060-6gb-gddr5-windows-10/12321210.aspx?icmp=Recos_3across_tp_sllng_prdcts

 

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It's not too shabby. Are you budgeting for a new display as well?

Here seems to be Dell's latest and greatest Ultrasharp 24" ISP=Based Monitor.

I would use what is called a "DisplayPort" cable for the best results and wouldn't use the traditional 15-pin blue VGA port. That computer has a DisplayPort on the back, it's the weird looking HDMI port.

 

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Brian,

 

What do you think of this one?  

 

https://www.bestbuy.ca/en-ca/product/cyberpowerpc-cyberpowerpc-ultra-gua600-gaming-pc-amd-fx-6300-2tb-hdd-16gb-ram-nvidia-geforce-gtx-1050-ti-eng-gua600/10528291.aspx?

 

It's on sale right now $999.00(Canadian) I'm thinking of maybe waiting until black friday to see what I can get or getting someone to custom build me a new one. I love my monitor I have now so I guess it's important to make sure the new PC will have the regular 15 pin VGA port because it's what I have on this monitor and I don't really want to buy a new one. 

and What are you thoughts on 16mb ram vs 32mb?  should I focus on more or is 16mb ok I just don't want to be doing this again in two years lol 

 

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If you want the best color, contrast and sharpness, today's fancy screens require a digital connection. So just having a VGA Port just doesn't cut it. You have no idea on what you are missing out on. So I would budget for a new display if you don't have any other ports than a 15-pin VGA connection.

The VGA port has been around since 1989. Manufacturers don't have to pay royalties on that technology anymore, which makes their COGS lower and results in more profit. VGA is fine for general computing and web browsing. For editing photos, notsomuch. In fact, VGA was only meant to go up to a 20" CRT (Tube) Display. Not a Flatscreen. Once you see the difference, you won't ever go back.

As for the PC you linked to, even though it's a "Gaming" computer, that AMD CPU chip is really under-powered. I'd skip that one. Though the rest of the specs seem to be fine. The company is saving money and offering a $999 computer by skipping out on a decent CPU. They hope that you won't notice since it's marketed as a "Gaming" computer. Always look at the specs. 

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Ok perfect, I'm going to see if I can have someone build me one as I can't seem to find one already built to suit my needs, I'll also get a new monitor then might as well get the best of the best while I'm at it lol. What CPU chip should I get?

 

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Yeah, I'm in the same boat. I think I'm going to end up building my next computer.

If you go the Intel route, get a Intel Core i7-7700 @ 3.6GHz CPU. If you do end up getting a AMD-based Computer, make sure it has a AMD Ryzen 7 2700X @ 3.7GHz CPU chip in it. Those two chips are each others equivalents. At this point, deciding on what chip you will purchase will determine what motherboard you will use. I like Asus Motherboards. Gigabyte Motherboards aren't bad either. I've used both. After choosing the Motherboard, you then can buy the RAM that is meant for it, which is the next step:

16GB RAM at a Minimum. 32GB Preferred.

Then we pick the HD:

1TB Main HD for the OS and Programs and then a second larger hard drive, like 4TB for your data.

Some folks will buy a SSD drive like this one.  Others will opt for a drive like this WD PCIe m.2 Drive, or this Samsung NVMe SSD Drive. I highly recommend a Western Digital Caviar Black 7200RPM drive if you go the traditional route for your main boot drive.

Power Supply, 750 Watts these days is good. If you get a video card that requires a lot of "Umph," maybe a 850 Watt P/S would be better.

Oh, there is the cooling system you will need to consider, along with the computer case.

Video Card: Here is Adobe's List of tested cards. I'd get at least a 4GB Card and one that was made around 2015 or newer. 

 

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That $1399.99 one you just linked to I like.

The main problem I keep running into with building one myself, is the price-tag. I have a tendency to purchase the high-quality components. The reason is I keep my computers for 8-10 years. So my final cost seems to end up over $2500. That's why I've never put together a "What to Buy" thread. I'm still researching.

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OK. One slight Red Flag. It only has a HDMI port for video. The monitor that I recommended above has a DisplayPort, DVI Port and VGA Port. No HDMI port. Therefore, you will need a HDMI to DVI cable in order for that Dell 24" monitor to work.

https://www.monoprice.com/product?p_id=2404

Before you click buy on anything, run it by me first. :)

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Oh, I recommend SSD Drives. Just not small capacity SSD drives. That's why I linked to 1TB SSD drives. m.2 drives are all the rage now, you just need a motherboard to support it. Where folks run into problems is their computers come with a 128GB SSD Drive and then they dump all their files to that drive, which results in problems. I don't care how fast a SSD Drive is, it won't do you a damn bit of good if it's full. 

If you go with a traditional hard drive, make sure they are 7200RPM and not 5400RPM and it's at least 1TB.

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I'm not a fan of Seagate Hard Drives. I've had multiple Seagate Hard Drives fail on me over the years. Personally, I like the Western Digital Caviar Black Line. It is important to get the "Black." Don't get a "Green" drive or other eco-friendly hard drives as they tend to fail. The other thing that concerns me is the 250GB SSD Drive. I know SSD Drives are fast, but I deal with threads of full SSD Drives all the time and a full SSD drive won't do you a damn bit of good. You want at least a 500GB Drive, and honestly, I'd get a 1TB SSD drive. Otherwise you will have to be ANAL on what is installed on the C Drive. You won't be able to just click, next-next-next, yes, ok, ok...next-next-next, finish. Sure let me import all my photos on the Main Drive, etc. You will have to only install Windows and some programs and put everything else on the 2TB or 4TB drive. So it will be custom installs for you. 

Otherwise, everything looks fine.

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