Brian

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About Brian

  • Birthday 01/30/1973

Member Information

  • Main editing computer
    Mac desktop
  • Editing software
    Lightroom with Photoshop
  • Monitor Calibrator
    X-Rite
  • Cameras, lenses and other photographic equipment
    Nikon D3s, Nikon D700, Nikon Trinity and a few other toys. Follow me on Instagram! @bybrianh

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  1. I'm curious, just how large is your corrupted catalog file? Right-Click and do a properties on the catalog.
  2. FYI: 80% in LR is equal to "10" in PS. 100% in LR is equal to "12" in PS. Adobe's ratings are based on a 1 --> 12 method. "11" in PS would be "90%" in LR, "9" would be "70%," and so on.
  3. Oh, if you want CleanMyMac to do anything substantial, you need to pay for it. I highly recommend it and you should be able to find a coupon code online to help lower the cost. Search for "MacPaw coupon code."
  4. Gemini is the leading duplicate file finder for the Mac. 250GB is microscopic by today's standards. 12 GB free is really-really bad and the source of your problems. With a 250GB drive, you need to be hyper anal on what gets stored. No photos or files. Only operating system and programs. Gemini should help, it will generate a list of duplicates and let you decide what to do.
  5. Apple is releasing a new operating system today. If anyone is running LR 5, PS CS6, PS CS5, or any earlier versions of this software, DO NOT UPGRADE!!! Adobe is only working on current versions of their products to make them compatible with the new OS. This includes LR CC, PS CC and Bridge CC. It is possible that they are working with LR 6, but that's about it. PS CS6 and LR5 are no longer being updated. In addition, there is a new file system on the horizon that will replace the current Journaled HFS+ file system. This new file system is 100% not-compatible with CS6. Bottom Line: LR5 users, CS5 / CS6 users should avoid macOS Sierra completely. Adobe will not be providing patches to fix any compatibility issues with macOS Sierra at this point. Only install macOS Sierra if you are using the Creative Cloud version of Adobe's Products. If you are thinking about buying a new Mac and are running PS CS6 or earlier or LR5 or earlier, you WILL NEED TO SIGN UP FOR THE "Adobe CC" $9.99 /month (plus applicable taxes) program and will no longer be able to use CS6. So for those who want to own their software and not give into "The Man," with a leased software model, you are kinda SOL going forward. Adobe has put CS6 out to pasture at this point and will soon take it behind the proverbial barn and shoot it dead. Just like CS5, CS4, CS3, etc.
  6. Apple is releasing a new operating system today. If anyone is running LR 5, PS CS6, PS CS5, or any earlier versions of this software, DO NOT UPGRADE!!! Adobe is only working on current versions of their products to make them compatible with the new OS. This includes LR CC, PS CC and Bridge CC. It is possible that they are working with LR6, but that's about it. PS CS6 and LR5 are no longer being updated. In addition, there is a new file system on the horizon that will replace the current Journaled HFS+ file system. This new file system is 100% not-compatible with CS6. Bottom Line: LR5 users, CS5 / CS6 users should avoid macOS Sierra completely. Adobe will not be providing patches to fix any compatibility issues with macOS Sierra at this point. Only install macOS Sierra if you are using the Creative Cloud version of Adobe's Products. If you are thinking about buying a new Mac and are running PS CS6 or earlier or LR5 or earlier, you WILL NEED TO SIGN UP FOR THE "Adobe CC" $9.99 /month (plus applicable taxes) program and will no longer be able to use CS6. So for those who want to own their software and not give into "The Man," with a leased software model, you are kinda SOL at this point. Adobe has put CS6 out to pasture at this point and will soon take it behind the proverbial barn and shoot it dead. Just like CS5, CS4, CS3, etc. I'm pinning this topic for about a week or so, this way as members cycle through, we can give them a heads up.
  7. Also, is this a full frame body? If so, have you shot with it for awhile? The reason I ask is this type of thing usually bites photographers who have switched from a crop sensor to a full frame sensor. You have to think differently. The reason has to do with the larger full frame sensor has a different angle of view, forcing you to get closer...which means you need to stop down to compensate. At f/3.2, this close to the subject with a full frame body, your DoF is razor thin, so it's easy to have one eye in focus and the other one out of focus. I know, baby photographers like the fuzzy-wuzzy sleeping baby photos. This shot might have called for a 85mm or even a 105mm (non-macro). Since the focal length is longer, the DoF changes. Or you could have tried f/4 or even f/5.6. That would have helped.
  8. Yes. This is normal. Especially if you have a new iMac with a 5K Retina Screen. You will notice more flaws in your photos, and start to see more of the quirks and shortcomings with your lenses. Isn't technology fun?
  9. HARD DRIVE. 243.24GB free out of 999.35GB is not good. You want that "free" number closer to 500GB.
  10. One more thing, the screws on the access panel do not come off. They have little retainers, so when you unscrew each screw, it will stay on the access panel.
  11. Here is a video demonstrating the process. You will want to REMOVE the existing RAM so that all the banks are empty. When you go to install the RAM, it only goes in one way, so if it doesn't fit, flip it over and try again. You will need a little "Umph" to insert the RAM fully in each slot. I had a friend try to do it and she said it wouldn't work. It turns out that she "Had to make her fingers hurt a little..." in order to get the RAM fully seated.
  12. The reason why I'm suggesting you purchase the 4GB sticks is that in 2011, Apple started changing things. Some systems would support 8GB sticks, others didn't. Some computers would only go up to 16GB Max, others would go up to 32GB. Apple never really made an official statement, but in my experience, if the iMac as a built-in DVD SuperDrive, I can almost guarantee you that your Mac goes up to 16GB and takes 4GB DIMMs in each socket. The 8GB DIMMs started in the 2012-era with iMacs that didn't have a DVD Drive built in. That said, there were models that took the 8GB sticks. The Crucial Scanning Tool will help determining this.
  13. I wouldn't bother upgrading the internal HD on your iMac. SSD or otherwise, since it's from 2011. Yes, it will speed things up, but it's more of a hassle than anything. I would increase the RAM to 16GB. That will require a quantity of four 4GB DIMMs. Since you have 4GB now, that is a quantity of two 2GB DIMMs. You will need to remove those two existing modules and install TWO 8GB kits. Your machine takes 4GB sticks, not 8GBs So if you are buying a 16GB kit, chances are that's two 8GB DIMMs, which is NOT what you want. I would purchase this External Thunderbolt Drive. It's cheaper than buying a 1TB SSD Drive, and will give you 4TB of storage. I would transfer all your data files over to it. Get the internal HD cleaned off. Once you hit more than 75% full on a HD when it comes to Macs, performance takes a huge hit. Combine that with 4GB (My God Woman, you need more RAM!!) and if your Mac Desktop has all sorts of files and folders, performance takes another hit. Now for the RAM. Chances are you will need TWO OF THESE KITS, but I still want you to run the Crucial System Scanner before buying anything.
  14. Also, replacing the HD with a SSD is going to require someone who is either certified, or knows what they are doing. Replacing the HD requires removing the display, and the Macs from 2012 to present use a special glue to keep things together. (No, you can't buy this glue.) It's a real PITA and honestly, I'd invest in a large Thunderbolt EHD than attempt to replace the internal HD.
  15. Getting a 1TB SSD drive isn't going to do much. Except speed things up. The problem is not your 1TB drive, the problem is that it's almost full. You want to keep 75% free. So I'd free up a few hundred gigs first, before blowing money on a SSD Drive. Target 400GB free to start. Time to delete those 75 Raw images of your lunch from 3 years ago. Be ruthless in culling.