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Damien,

Is there any problem with saving a file as a tiff instead of a psd ?  I've been uploading my photos after editing to a website which doesn't accept psd format.  I don't want to save a jpeg due to obvious reason of degradation.  I'm trying to avoid having too many versions of the same photo as that would quickly become confusing. Also, related question about saving-when I convert a jpeg to a tiff I usually bump up to resolution to 300 dpi or even 600.  I reduce/enlarge the image size to around 9x12 because one rarely needs a print any larger than that for personal use.  Am I doing the right thing here? Some of my photos are old snapshots and can be blurry.  

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Hi @Laurie23, I've moved your question into its own separate thread, because there's so much to discuss here.

First, can you elaborate on this?

1 hour ago, Laurie23 said:

I've been uploading my photos after editing to a website

What kind of website?  I mean, for what purpose are you uploading your photos to it?

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The website is Flickr.  I'm using it only to share with friends and family.

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Then this whole question is moot.  You MUST upload jpeg files.

2 hours ago, Laurie23 said:

I don't want to save a jpeg due to obvious reason of degradation.

This is utter nonsense.

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There is ABSOLUTELY no visible difference between a high quality jpeg and a tiff file.  All you're doing is forcing your family to download unnecessarily huge files.  They won't thank you for that at all.

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19 minutes ago, Damien Symonds said:

Then this whole question is moot.  You MUST upload jpeg files.

This is utter nonsense.

Why are you saying this is nonsense? Seriously....from what I read if you save as a jpeg, and edit further and then resave as a jpeg each time you resave as a jpeg you lose data and the image degrades further. Is this not true? After I read this I started saving everything I work on as tiff files.

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13 minutes ago, Damien Symonds said:

There is ABSOLUTELY no visible difference between a high quality jpeg and a tiff file.  All you're doing is forcing your family to download unnecessarily huge files.  They won't thank you for that at all.

The jpegs which they sent me or that I downloaded from Facebook are sometimes huge in size, like 45".  If I saved as a tiff at 45" it would be outrageously large, I agree! But if they want to download an image I have worked on and print it then I would think raising the resolution to 300 dpi and making the image smaller would make more sense, no? 

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9 minutes ago, Laurie23 said:

Why are you saying this is nonsense? Seriously....from what I read if you save as a jpeg, and edit further and then resave as a jpeg each time you resave as a jpeg you lose data and the image degrades further. Is this not true?

Of course it's true.  That's why your editing files are PSDs or TIFFs - with their layers.

But the files we give to clients, or friends, or send to the lab, are ALWAYS JPEGS.  Because the editing is finished.

6 minutes ago, Laurie23 said:

The jpegs which they sent me or that I downloaded from Facebook are sometimes huge in size, like 45".

What?  How are you judging this?

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When I open the file in Photoshop I check the resolution and image size.  Usually the photos are 72 dpi  and sometimes they are very large.  I understand what you are saying about giving images to clients as jpegs because the editing is finished. I have a somewhat unusual situation in which I am putting together restored images of family and ancestors so everyone can have a copy. I might want to do further work on the images so for my own sake I save them as tiffs.  But as you say, it IS sort of a moot point as far as the person who downloads it is concerned because even if I save it and upload it to Flickr as a tiff when they download it Flickr gives you a jpeg.  I think that's misleading as they give you a choice of what size to download and even if you choose "original size" and the original I uploaded is a tiff, they still give you a jpeg.

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6 minutes ago, Laurie23 said:

Usually the photos are 72 dpi  and sometimes they are very large.

Yes, but that means they're NOT very large.

Please read: https://www.damiensymonds.net/file-size-html/

7 minutes ago, Laurie23 said:

I might want to do further work on the images so for my own sake I save them as tiffs.

Of course.  You'd be crazy not to.  It doesn't have to be TIFF, it can be PSD. Either is fine.

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Hi Damien, 

Many thanks for your patience. I read the article on file size and megapixels, then your guidelines for scanning old photos and photographing old photos.  They were helpful.  I have been scanning at 600 ppi but only 24 bit.  I have a scanner which can scan at 48 bit so I'll use that from now on.  Some of the old photos I have only digital copies and they are all over the map as far as image quality and megapixels.  I have to take what I can get as the images are coming from all different parties.  

I hate to try your patience further but I took a look at some of the jpegs I had been given as originals and the tiff files I converted them to.  I checked ppi, how many megapixels and how many inches.  Here is the breakdown on 2 of my photos.

Image 1 jpeg: 72 ppi    34.417"  x 45.889" = 8187312 pixels

                     tiff: 300 ppi   9"  x 12"= 9720000 pixels

Image 2 jpeg: 72 ppi.   55.556" x 41.667" = 12000000 pixels

                        600 ppi  20 x 16.49" = 1.1872800 pixels

By saving the tiff files as much higher resolution but smaller image size I hoped to maintain or even improve quality without having a huge file. I also thought, maybe mistakenly that when it came to the fine details I was better off making these changes before attempting any restoration.  Please correct me if I'm wrong....and I know you will. :)

 

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Completely wrong, yes.  There is absolutely no benefit, only drawbacks, to artificially changing the size of your digital files.

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5 hours ago, Laurie23 said:

when I convert a jpeg to a tiff I usually bump up to resolution to 300 dpi or even 600.  I reduce/enlarge the image size to around 9x12 because one rarely needs a print any larger than that for personal use.  Am I doing the right thing here? Some of my photos are old snapshots and can be blurry.  

I cannot stress this enough.  DO NOT DO THIS.  Whatever size you scanned it at, that's the best size for it.

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