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ChristyB

Using TCs

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Hi Brian,

I have a D850 and I recently bought a used Nikon 300mm f/2.8 lens. I had rented this lens a few years ago and loved it, but there's no way I could afford to buy it new. When a local photog was selling his Nikon gear (he was switching to Sony) I dug into my savings and splurged on that lens.

I'm learning how to use it and any out-of-focus photos are definitely operator error. I'm getting some decent photos so I'm getting there. I've never used TCs before. When I add a 1.4x or 2.0x TC to the lens I'm having problems getting good focus with them. I'm not figuring out what I'm doing wrong.

Do you have any thoughts or are there any guidelines to help me learn how to use the TCs?

Thanks!

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I forgot to include that I'm shooting wildlife - birds and we have wild horses in our area. It's been bright daylight and I was shooting on shutter speed priority. ISO in the 100-200 range and shutter speed around 1/2000. I lower shutter speed if they're not active.

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9 hours ago, ChristyB said:

When I add a 1.4x or 2.0x TC to the lens I'm having problems getting good focus with them. I'm not figuring out what I'm doing wrong.

You aren't doing anything wrong. That's the nature of TCs. :D 

Basically, when you use Teleconverters, your Image Quality takes a hit. Especially when you get to the 2.0TC range. Getting sharp focus also becomes an issue. Unfortunately it takes time and practice and knowing what your gear will and won't do in certain lighting conditions. If you really want those Nat Geo Sharp Photos, you are using $10,000-$15,000 lenses. Nothing beats a true 600mm f/4 vs a 300mm f/2.8 with a 2.0 TC attached.

Not to mention the whole losing a stop of light thing. I'm sure you are well aware, you lose 1-Stop of Light with a 1.4TC and 2-Stops of Light with a 2.0TC. So don't be afraid to crank up your ISO to 400-800. You could also try the D850 in DX mode for an extra umph when using the 1.4TC. Try it, see what happens.

The other thing that helps greatly is to use a Monopod (or Tripod) out in the field when using a TC. The longer the focal length, the more camera shake becomes an issue. You also might want to shut off VR if your SS is that high. (1/2000 or more). Experiment and then pixel-peep. I wish I could give you a magic formula to make things all better, but it's a Teleconverter. LOL! 

Between the two TC, the 1.4 will give you the best Image Quality but not the reach I'm sure you are after. You might just want to use that one and shoot the hell out of it so you get used to what works and what doesn't. Also learn all of the focus modes with the D850. Try to use D9 and maybe Group AF on Continuous Focus (AF-C).

One more point I'd like to add, is do not be crop-happy in POST. I know the D850 has all those MP, and it's so easy to crop, but you are taking a IQ hit to start with by using a TC, then taking another IQ hit when you crop in Post. You might want to rethink how you approach your subjects. Utilizing Blinds or Wear Camouflage might help you compose a little better so you don't have to crop as much. Just a thought. 

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Oh Brian, thank you so much for all of the great information! I'm so glad it's not all me that's causing the soft photos. 600mm prime lenses are way way above my pay grade so I'll figure out how to make what I have work. I knew that I wouldn't be taking photos like Andy Parkinson or some other Nat Geo photog, but once in a while I'm in the right place at the right time with the right lighting and can turn out something fairly decent. I will definitely bump up the ISO when I use the TCs going forward and see what I get. I use Continuous Auto Focus, but will spend more time with D9 and the other options. I have a tripod and a leg unscrews for a monopod, which I have used from time to time. The last two times I found the wild horses I parked my car in a field, rested that heavy camera and lens on the window (the foot of the lens with padding of course) to help stabilize it.

I haven't used the D850 on the DX mode. I will look into it. I still have my old D7200 body and when I rented the 300mm lens a few years ago, I shot with the D7200 for part of the time. It took some damn good photos, and got me closer to the critters. I printed one of the photos that had really good focus 20x30 in Damien's Print Sharpening class. It was the photo I used for the 20x30 tests. I was blown away.

Question - I know it sounds sacrilegious, but maybe I should put the 300mm lens on my old DX camera and use other lenses on the D850? Does that sound insane?

I wouldn't have a 600mm equivalent but if I'm not getting good photos with a 2x converter, what the heck. Having said that I will try bumping up the ISO and see what happens with the TCs. I hadn't thought about turning off the VR when the SS is 1/2,000+. I'll experiment with that, too. I'll learn what to expect.

Regarding cropping in the workflow, I've been taking Damien's classes since mid-May. I started with Bridge and I'm now almost 3 months into Levels. So trust me, the last thing I would EVER do is crop in the workflow!! :D Before taking his classes I was self-taught and struggled through figuring out Photoshop. When I heard about this crazy Australian who threw people out of his group for mentioning Remini, I knew I had to check this guy out! I have learned sooooo much. I'm not a pro photog and have no intentions of going pro. I enjoy photography and I'm getting the biggest kick out of learning Photoshop and how to edit. It's been a wonderful ride so far.

We have bald eagle season in January and I want to get this figured out so I'm not making new lens newbie mistakes and will know what to expect as I'm trying to hopefully capture some good photos. I have an old slow Nikon 300-500mm lens, but if the light isn't excellent, forget it. I knew that when I bought it and I knew its limitations. My new lens is more forgiving.

Thank you so much for taking the time to explain what's happening and giving me some great ideas to try. I know I'll get this figured out and I really appreciate your being available for questions!

 

 

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19 hours ago, ChristyB said:

I shot with the D7200 for part of the time. It took some damn good photos, and got me closer to the critters.

Here's a dirty little secret with Crop Bodies using FX lenses...since the DX Sensor is physically smaller than a Full Frame (FX), the sensor only utilizes the center-most portion of the lens, which is the BEST part of the lens. This is why Crop Shooters can get a DX Body and a 50mm f/1.8 lens and become a "Professional Photographer" in less than a weekend. ;) FX bodies are less forgiving since they use the entire lens and you will see flaws in your lenses, usually around the sides / corners.

19 hours ago, ChristyB said:

I know it sounds sacrilegious, but maybe I should put the 300mm lens on my old DX camera and use other lenses on the D850? Does that sound insane?

It's not. Try it. Also, explore DX Mode with your D850. The reason I mention this, is the D850 uses the same focusing system as the D5, though the D5 "thinks" faster. Try both; it's digital, you can afford to experiment. There is a reason that a Nikon D500 is a great camera for what you shoot with and the D7200 isn't that much different in the grand scheme of things. (Minus build quality, focusing systems, etc.) That reason is the MPs around the center of the sensor, it just produces better results. Honesty? I'd flip to Crop Mode which is a 1.5 multiplier, similar to your 1.4TC AND you don't suffer the 1-stop of light loss. The only downside is you will see the edges in the viewfinder darken, so it throws you a little when looking in the viewfinder.

19 hours ago, ChristyB said:

When I heard about this crazy Australian who threw people out of his group for mentioning Remini, I knew I had to check this guy out!

Yes, Damien and I are brutally honest. It's not that we are Big Meanies, it's that there is so much Bullshit advice out on the internet, we don't want to waste time, yours or ours. We want you to succeed and have simplified workflows. Honestly, we are like those teachers in High School that everyone hated; the ones who make their students sweat a little and WORK for their grade. They may not like us, but dammit...you will learn something. :) 

 

19 hours ago, ChristyB said:

We have bald eagle season in January and I want to get this figured out so I'm not making new lens newbie mistakes and will know what to expect as I'm trying to hopefully capture some good photos. I have an old slow Nikon 300-500mm lens, but if the light isn't excellent, forget it. I knew that when I bought it and I knew its limitations. My new lens is more forgiving.

Truth be told, I'd love to have a 180-400 f/4, but I don't have that kinda cash. :)

I've never heard of the Nikon 300-500 lens, do you mean the 200-500? Yes, definitely experiment with D9 and VR off. Especially in good light and fast shutter speeds, 1/1000th or faster. 

Yes, Professional Grade f/2.8 Glass is f/2.8 Glass. There is a difference. Not only in build quality, but image quality as well. The downside is, people won't believe you and argue that their 3rd party lens is "Just as good as..." No, it's not. It just isn't...but what can you do? :)

19 hours ago, ChristyB said:

We have bald eagle season in January and I want to get this figured out so I'm not making new lens newbie mistakes and will know what to expect as I'm trying to hopefully capture some good photos.

There is only one way to accomplish this:

YOU NEED TO LEARN YOUR GEAR.

Eat. Sleep. Breathe. with one lens and one lens only. Shoot everything and everything. Learn what the lens will do and won't do. Then mount a 1.4TC, rinse and repeat. Canon produced a funny advertisement some years ago, but this illustrates what I'm talking about:

104175312_ScreenShot2021-09-28at8_11_43PM.thumb.png.9211d0fc8b8851c3e637e8853d980960.png

You want to get to the point of creating an image in your mind, then automatically reaching into your bag, WITHOUT THINKING, in what lens/TC Combo (or just lens) to produce that photograph. Sorry, there is no easy way or quick YouTube Video. You must practice, you NEED to fiddle. Then pixel-peep. It's very much like ear-training and learning to play a musical instrument. Photography deals with light photons instead of sound waves, but they are very similar in the Grand Scheme of Things.

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Your description of a DX body with an FX lens and the dirty little secret is freaking awesome! :D I like your bottom line - basically go with the crop mode and ditch the TC. Why add a stop, another piece of glass between the lens and the photo I want to capture? As you said, there is a difference with f/2.8 glass. I'm so glad that local photog was selling all of his Nikon gear and that I could buy it used. When I rented that lens it made me look good. When I told a professional photographer friend about that, all he did was smile and say, it's the lens. :)I appreciate your heads-up on the edges of the viewfinder darkening when I try the crop mode. It makes sense. Everything you said makes sense. I really like the D850's fast focusing capabilities. It doesn't miss too often. I will miss it, but that's operator error. Oh, and the Nikon 300-500 lens was a typo.

I hear you about getting to know my equipment. I shot film in the 90s and early 2000s. I scuba dived and shot underwater photography with a Nikon N90s in an Ikelite housing and strobe. I would do 2-3 dives in a day, shoot a roll of 36 per dive, get back to land, wait for the film to be developed, get it back a week later and then try to remember what I did on each dive that got X results. I read books, attended seminars and workshops. I got to the point where I knew what camera, lens and strobe settings I needed for each shot. I joined the LA Underwater Photographic Society and was on the board for a while. I lived and breathed it. Then we got out of scuba diving, digital came in, life and work took up more time, and I put photography aside for years. You're right. Now I just need to put in the hours to get to know my equipment. And the good news, as you said, it's digital! An added bonus is I'm learning to edit and it's making me a better photographer. I have a long way to go and it's all good. I'm enjoying the journey!

Another question, if you have the time. Speaking of film days, we used polarizers, ND filters, etc. With the power of today's Photoshop, is there still a need for these? Camera shops say yes, but I thought I'd ask.

I am so glad that you and Damien are brutally honest. Hey, I'm old ;) I've done a lot of stuff and I've learned a lot of stuff. The absolute best instructors and coaches I've had were brutally honest. They didn't mince words and I made the biggest and fastest gains from those instructors. I'm here to learn. "Big Meanies" like you and Damien don't intimidate me and I don't take it personally. :D

I am grateful that you and Damien spend time helping us. I've learned a lot from your responses to my questions here. I really, really appreciate it. I've also seen your posts on AD. I lurk and learn. You have so much knowledge and experience and again, thank you for caring and sharing it!

 

 

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Oh, I totally get the whole, "36 tries to get it right." I started with film as well, back in the 1980's. Hell, I shot my 1st Wedding at 19 with film, and a split prism (manual focus.) It was a Minolta X-370. Still have that camera.

18 hours ago, ChristyB said:

Speaking of film days, we used polarizers, ND filters, etc. With the power of today's Photoshop, is there still a need for these? Camera shops say yes, but I thought I'd ask.

It's a very valid question. Out of all the filters in use today, there is only one that Photoshop can not duplicate: The Circular Polarizer. Everything else can be mimicked. That said, getting things right in camera is still the best way. Especially if you want to have a really slow shutter speed; you can take a 30 second exposure, or spend 30 or more minutes in Photoshop dorking around with a photo, only to have mixed results. 

I have a love-affair with my CP and chances are if you see water or if I'm shooting landscapes in crappy light, I'm probably using my CP. Which one do I use? I'm so glad you were about to ask...

Nikon Circular Polarizer II Filter - 77mm

Of course, like with everything else, it's out of stock currently.

I also like B+W Filters. I do have a Neutral Density Filter, both a Negative 2 Stop and Negative 3 Stop Filter. I've also toyed around with the idea of getting a Variable ND filter, but have yet to pull the trigger. I'm still thinking about ND filters and maybe get into a Cokin Square Filter System, especially since I have a 14-24mm f/2.8. (No screw-in mounts with that lens.)

But I have other things to buy first. ;) I have really stopped chasing gear, the next level for me are $10,000+ lenses. I really would like a 180-400mm f/4.

Well, hit me up for more Gear Talk at any time, I welcome it since "Crickets Chirp" here in Ask Brian on most days.

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Speaking of filters...

Here is one photo with both my Circular Polarizer, ND filter and Graduated ND Filters Mounted. It's also about 6 or so shots combined because I had a huge dynamic range swing (about a 6 stop difference) between the Darks and the Lights. Of course, I was mounted on a Tripod:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BpNyb0_guOf/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

(This is a screen shot, do not judge color/quality. Just visit my IG for the original photo.)

Screen Shot 2021-09-29 at 7.38.01 PM.png

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I LOVE that photo! Wow, that's a huge dynamic range. I've never stacked or combined photos. Something that's intrigued me, but I know that I need to get the basics figured out first.

I have Nikon Circular Polarizers II Filters on my 24-70mm f/2.8 and 20mm f/1.8. When I retired a couple of years ago my awesome husband bought me the D850 and 24-70 lens as a retirement present. A local camera shop had an annual trade show with the major manufacturers attending (before Covid). I spent the day using the D850 to see if I liked it. I wasn't sold on mirrorless and I've since found out from photogs who switched that their D850s had faster focusing and more hits compared to their new D7s. I was surprised at that with all of Nikon's hype on mirrorless. Or maybe not surprised...

I looked at my lenses and I see that I also have UV filters on those two lenses. Again, the camera shop said that I needed them. Are UV filters necessary? In general, I don't like adding "glass" to my lenses unless it truly helps.

I found you on IG and started following you. I'm on IG, but don't judge me ;) The few photos I posted are from a few years ago, some jpeg and some raw, edited in LR and probably a bit of PS. As I previously said, I was self-taught. I never liked LR. I felt the interface was awkward. I didn't feel comfortable fully switching to PS until I started taking Damien's classes. I was going to delete those photos and replace them with updated edits. I should just delete them and add updates when I have some time. They're embarrassing now!

Today I went out and shot some photos in the D850 crop mode with the 300 lens. I love it! What a difference! Thank you, thank you so much, Brian! You saved me so much time troubleshooting the issues I was experiencing. I had just put the lens on the camera when a stallion started a confrontation. I hadn't tweeked my camera settings yet so my shutter speed was at 1/320th. They aren't as sharp as I'd like, but they're not too far off. It won't take much to shoot better focus. I'm really excited. After the "action," I played around with the settings taking boring photos, and my starting settings for daylight going forward will be ISO 200, 1/1000th which will give me a DOF around f/5-f/8. That works for me with wild horse photos if I have to start shooting quickly. I can easily adjust as needed. Cloudy days and flying birds will be different. It feels so good to have a baseline.

Switching between FX and DX is fast, but I want to figure out how to set up a quick key so I can toggle back and forth.

I know that megabytes and megapixels are different. The file sizes of the D850 DX were around 25mb. That's about the same size as the D7200. I googled file size and it said that the D850 DX's file size of 15 megapixels is smaller than the D7200 at 25 megapixels. I had previously read Damien's article, "How Close Can You Crop?" so I'm not concerned about printing a DX or a general crop of the D850 DX. But I found it interesting that there was that much mp difference between the two DXs.

Thank you again for sharing your knowledge and helping me sort through all of this stuff. What a relief! Now I need to get out more and shoot! :D

 

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3 hours ago, ChristyB said:

Are UV filters necessary?

NO!

UV Filters were meant for B&W FILM!!!

Honestly? They are a huge profit-maker for the reseller, a pure up-sell.

"Protection" my ass. If you drop a lens or smack into something, you wanna know what breaks? It isn't the front lens element. Oh no...it is the damn auto-focusing system / vibration reduction module built into the lens...THAT is what breaks! Now of course, if you are shooting with a consumer-grade 18-55 kit lens, you could bend the screw thread mounting ring if you smack into something hard, but we are talking about cheap plastic lenses. Chances are the font lens element will be fine, even on a 18-55 lens. (Watch until the end). Oh, watch this Video: Steve Perry does an excellent job of really torturing a filter.

I have personally dropped a 70-300VR lens, that I owned for a total of 3 days onto concrete...it just fell out of my bag because I didn't zip it all the way. After freaking out, I then mounted the lens, and the front lens element was perfectly fine, but the VR Motor was completely shot and it wouldn't focus properly. $450 later it was "fixed" but not with new components. So my brand-new $600 lens turned into a used $1050 lens. I was not happy.

UV Filters are flimsy and are easily broken. So it's very easy to show people how valiantly the UV Filter sacrificed itself for the benefit of your $3000 lens. Bullshit. If you want to "Protect" your lens...use your Lens Hood! I could go on ranting, and I can say this, if you are shooting in an environment that is throwing mud and stone at you and hitting your lens, I'd say a UV filter will help you in the sense that you can pop off one, put on a fresh one and keep shooting while your assistant cleans the dirty filter. Other than that, the IQ hit and the weird flares you get, along with potential focusing issues...leave the damn UV filters off. Again, use your Lens Hood. Both indoors and outdoors.

3 hours ago, ChristyB said:

D850s had faster focusing and more hits compared to their new D7s.

Yep. I'm holding off for now with going Mirrorless. In reality, you need the true Mirrorless Lenses to go with the Mirrorless bodies to take full advantage of the Mirrorless System's features. Don't think for a second by using the FTZ Adapter that you will get awesome results. It just makes the lens compatible or just usable in a sense. For the most part, the FTZ adapter works fine for the majority. Sometimes it doesn't, especially for the situations that you are shooting in. I'm very curious about the new Z9 body, that is supposed to be the combination of a D6 and D850. Once the Pro-Grade stuff comes out, eventually it works its way down to the consumer products, just like it always has. Just think, a D3500 probably shoots circles around a old Nikon D1 or D2H. That is the way of technology; right now Mirrorless is for the Measurebators to foam / drool over or get into flaming wars on the internet. I'm done chasing gear. I have all the fancy lenses. I shoot with a D4s and D850. Have the Nikon Trinity, blah-blah-blah...plus a bunch of other crap that I don't need.

You know what? I still take crappy photos from time to time...only with really expensive gear. :DThe most important part of a camera is the area that occupies the 12" of cubed space behind the viewfinder!!! Now I will say, the pro-grade stuff does make things A LOT easier to obtain the shot and not be forced to dig into the menus, and I will never go back to the consumer-grade stuff; it feels like a Cheap Plastic Toy when I do.

3 hours ago, ChristyB said:

I hadn't tweeked my camera settings yet so my shutter speed was at 1/320th.

Back in the film days, the rule-of-thumb was your Shutter Speed needed to match your focal length, or somewhere close to it. For example, 50mm was at least 1/60th of a second or faster. 200mm was 1/250th, 300mm was 1/320th, etc. etc. The more MP you go, the higher the SS needs to be, especially on a D850. It's almost 4 over the focal length. Birds in flight? 1/1600th at least, maybe 1/1000th in good light.

3 hours ago, ChristyB said:

Switching between FX and DX is fast, but I want to figure out how to set up a quick key so I can toggle back and forth.

That's easy. Just set the record button on top to toggle between FX / DX. Limit it to just FX & DX and don't bother with the 5:4 mode, or 1.2 mode. When you press and hold the record button and rotate the rear command dial, it goes back and forth between FX & DX Modes. That's how I have my D850 setup. Steve Perry is a great resource and has a whole article for this very subject. Now he assigned is DoF Preview Button to toggle FX / DX Modes, I set my record button, (bottom left of the screen) since I don't do a lot of video. Explore the Controls Menu F1 Section. :)

3 hours ago, ChristyB said:

I know that megabytes and megapixels are different. The file sizes of the D850 DX were around 25mb

You must be using Lossless Compressed mode and a "Medium" Resolution. My files are uncompressed and are around 99MB or so. In reality...you wanna know how many MP do you truly  need? Anywhere between 10MP - 12MP. THAT'S IT!! In that range, you can print ANY size your heart desires. So if you do some serious cropping, try not to go below 12MP to be on the safe side. Seriously, the rest is just Marketing trying to get you to buy new equipment. Just think, a Nikon D6 camera, the current Flagship Body is only 20.8 MP!!!  Any higher is just bragging rights for people to get into arguments with each other online.

3 hours ago, ChristyB said:

I found you on IG and started following you. I'm on IG, but don't judge me

Thanks for the Follow! I won't judge. You are just looking at my Vacation Photos and the ones that go into my Wife's Annual Photo Album for Christmas each year.

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2 hours ago, Brian said:

NO!

Haha! I knew it was a scam. I'm laughing at myself for not listening to my bullshit meter when it went off :) Thanks for the links. I really like Steve Perry.
And yes, I have lens hoods!

I'm all for supporting your local camera shop, but they really have to stop giving crappy advice like that. I admit, I always check B&H when I'm shopping around. I bought my NIkon Circular Polarizer from B&H along with a lot of other stuff back to the film days. My local shop didn't have Nikon Polarizers and that's what I wanted. I was in the local shop when they talked me into a couple of UV filters. {{sigh}}

2 hours ago, Brian said:

I have personally dropped a 70-300VR lens, that I owned for a total of 3 days onto concrete...it just fell out of my bag because I didn't zip it all the way. After freaking out, I then mounted the lens, and the front lens element was perfectly fine, but the VR Motor was completely shot and it wouldn't focus properly. $450 later it was "fixed" but not with new components. So my brand-new $600 lens turned into a used $1050 lens. I was not happy.

Ouch!! I hate when that happens. I feel your pain. I flooded my N90s. I was talking to someone while I was sealing my camera in its housing. Never talk with anyone while sealing your camera in a housing so you don't lose concentration. That's an always rule. Salt water and electronics didn't mix. I remember climbing off the dive boat into the ocean and watching it flood. The horror.

2 hours ago, Brian said:

You know what? I still take crappy photos from time to time...only with really expensive gear. :DThe most important part of a camera is the area that occupies the 12" of cubed space behind the viewfinder!!! Now I will say, the pro-grade stuff does make things A LOT easier to obtain the shot and not be forced to dig into the menus, and I will never go back to the consumer-grade stuff; it feels like a Cheap Plastic Toy when I do.

Lol. I won't feel so bad when I take crappy photos now! :D

2 hours ago, Brian said:

Back in the film days, the rule-of-thumb was your Shutter Speed needed to match your focal length, or somewhere close to it. For example, 50mm was at least 1/60th of a second or faster. 200mm was 1/250th, 300mm was 1/320th, etc. etc. The more MP you go, the higher the SS needs to be, especially on a D850. It's almost 4 over the focal length. Birds in flight? 1/1600th at least, maybe 1/1000th in good light.

Great rule of thumb! I needed 1/1000th today, in good light. In the past I've needed at least 1/2000th | 1/2500 when shooting birds in flight. I know there are photographers who can capture flying birds at lower shutter speeds. I'm not one of them.

Re mirrorless: Typo. I meant Z7. That was the more expensive mirrorless du jour at the time.

2 hours ago, Brian said:

That's easy. Just set the record button on top to toggle between FX / DX. Limit it to just FX & DX and don't bother with the 5:4 mode, or 1.2 mode. When you press and hold the record button and rotate the rear command dial, it goes back and forth between FX & DX Modes. That's how I have my D850 setup. Steve Perry is a great resource and has a whole article for this very subject. Now he assigned is DoF Preview Button to toggle FX / DX Modes, I set my record button, (bottom left of the screen) since I don't do a lot of video. Explore the Controls Menu F1 Section. :)

Thanks for that! I'll look into setting the record button, Steve Perry's article and the F1 section. I think I remember that Mark Smith also has ways of setting up quick buttons. He wrote an ebook describing how he set up his D850 for bird photos and that may be in there.

3 hours ago, Brian said:

You must be using Lossless Compressed mode and a "Medium" Resolution. My files are uncompressed and are around 99MB or so. In reality...you wanna know how many MP do you truly  need? Anywhere between 10MP - 12MP. THAT'S IT!! In that range, you can print ANY size your heart desires. So if you do some serious cropping, try not to go below 12MP to be on the safe side. Seriously, the rest is just Marketing trying to get you to buy new equipment. Just think, a Nikon D6 camera, the current Flagship Body is only 20.8 MP!!!  Any higher is just bragging rights for people to get into arguments with each other online.

Thanks for the Follow! I won't judge. You are just looking at my Vacation Photos and the ones that go into my Wife's Annual Photo Album for Christmas each year.

Hmmm. I'll check my settings. So many settings to forget :)

-----

Anywhere between 10MP - 12MP. THAT'S IT!!

----

We have a lot more that that!
-------------

I understand that you don't want to collect any more expensive camera gear, but I hope Santa finds a way to deliver your 180-400 f/4 :D

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Yeah, the MP thing is just a way to get people to buy new gear. Honestly, 20-24MP is fine for really anybody, and that gives you enough wiggle-room to crop. At 12MP, you could print a 4 foot by 6 foot print with no problems. It just has to be sharpened correctly. (See Damien’s Sharpening Class). 
 

As much as I would like a 180-400 f/4, I can’t say I would be using it that much. I’m doing more traveling these last few years and honestly? My 24-70 is used the most. Even my 70-200 sits most days. 

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I recently took Damien's Print Sharpening Class so if I want to print 4'x6' I have it in my arsenal. 🙂 

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Hi Brian!

The DX mode appears to be working. I posted an action horse photo in the Raw class last night and asked Damien if he would have a minute to check focus. I'm not used to working with a 450mm effective focal length. He said the focus was good 🙂

I'm getting there. Thanks again for all of your help!

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