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How to reduce yellow cast on screen


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I'm on day 5 of my screen calibration mess and I'm searching for some kind advice about the best approach to best reduce a yellow tint on my laptop.

Problem: My laptop is still showing a yellow-green cast that deviates from my prints despite multiple calibrations. I'd like to reduce the cast a bit.
What do you guys think is the best way to go about and do that?
If I understand correctly it is probably caused by the white point setting, so cooling the kelvins a little bit might be a sane thing to do. Unfortunately it won't let me do that and I'm not sure if starting to fiddle with the color values in the graphic card's control panel would be a good idea.

Disclaimer: I think I have pretty much made every possible mistake in the book. That is to say, I spent a long time researching the topic of calibration before investing in a Spyder 5 Pro. Everyone and their mama blogged that it would be child's play, I was only a few clicks away from universal photo sharing and printing bliss, and finally fulfilling my duty as a dedicated lover of photography. Then life happened. It wasn't until I stumbled upon this amazing website on day four that I came to understand just how wrong I've been. On the plus side, this site is amazing, I'm glad I found it!

Calibration tool: Spyder 5 Pro.

Computer: I'm using a 4-year-old Asus K75VJ laptop.
Please don't hurt me. The horror of using this as a primary choice for photo editing has been duly noted on multiple occasions during these last five days. It's a laptop. It's old. It only displays 75% of sRGB and that's its best stat. Changes will be made in the future, but this is what I have to work with right now, so I need to tune it as best as I can until I get the possibility to invest in better equipment.
If I understood correctly the laptop screen should be using LED technology.

Graphic Cards: My laptop have two graphic cards; An integrated Intel HD Graphics 4000 for everything and a GeForce GT 635M for gaming. Both have been updated with the latest drivers found on the corresponding websites. The NVIDIA card has been disabled in attempt to figure out this mess.
I've set every single option I could find in the Intel HD Graphics Control Panel to either "disable" or "Application."

Upon contacting the Datacolor support I was advised to prevent the Intel HD Graphics Control Panel from running at startup by deactivating the igfxpers file. While at it, I also disabled the NVIDIA capture server and uninstalled the ASUS Splendid utility, along with a few other bloat wares that were lying around. Just in case.

I have followed the calibration instructions on this website and it has given me by far the best result. In case the website owner doesn't hear this often enough, he is right on every single point and his instructions are absolutely THE best. THANK YOU, my sanity will be forever grateful to you!!
If it wasn't for the suggestion to use prints to compare the results I would probably still be tearing my hairs out!

The calibration settings ended up being Gamma 2.2, White Point not adjusted, brightness adjusted to 84 cd, room light off. The calibration was done in a dark room where the laptop screen was the only light source.

The print matching to adjust the brightness prior calibrating and later to control how well they matched the screen after the calibration was first done in a well-lit room with several white ceiling lights. After reading the article about lighting conditions I also physically moved the laptop different places with various light source, including outside day light. They all seemed pretty consistent; Fairly good with nice colors, but with a greenish tint on screen that isn't in the prints.
Adjusting the screen brightness doesn't seem to affect the tint (and, as written in the guide, feels kind of unnatural now that I have adjusted to its more dim settings).

Thanks to your tutorial I feel I can technically live with the screen like this, but it would be nice if the pictures of the kid didn't look as Ninja Turtles-ish unless they really have to.
But how to best adjust it?

I feel I have looked and Googled anywhere, but I can't even find an option that tells what my current kelvin setting is, much less how to adjust it.
The Spyder 5 Pro only gives the option to set the White Point at 5000K, 5800K, 6500K and "Do Not Adjust" upon calibrating.
Nowhere does it say how to simply knock it up a little notch after calibration.

Any suggestions, ideas or experiences? :)
 

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11 hours ago, Damien Symonds said:

Hi, sorry about my delayed reply.

Uhm, no? You weren't delayed at all, and quite frankly, after having browsed the forums looking for ideas, I'm amazed that you still have any patience left to try and help the never ending line of calibration n00b like myself. Thank you for taking time out of your spare time to reply in the first place! :D

 

11 hours ago, Damien Symonds said:

At four years old, there's a chance that the screen isn't LED. In the course of your testing, have you also tried CCFL?

Do you know how I can do that? I can't seem to locate that option anywhere, and Google seems out of ideas as well.
Prior calibrating the Spyder 5 Pro only gives me the choice between a desktop and a laptop display type. I can't seem to find any other display options anywhere.
I have admittedly chosen the laptop option every time. I'll try running a full calibration with the desktop option and see if it changes anything!

 

11 hours ago, Damien Symonds said:

The second important question: Have you tried calibrating another computer? To see if there might be a fault with the Spyder? It's unlikely, of course, but not unheard-of.

I have not tried the Spyder calibration on another computer so I cannot exclude a faulty component. I only have access to another laptop, my husband's, and since I'm obviously not really sure of what I'm doing, I haven't dared to try calibrating it out of risk of messing up his laptop as well. That, plus the fact that my husband has already threatened to charge a steep beer fee for every day his laptop might display his favorite Football Manager team's color out of whack :P
This however is an excellent point. I'll try and see if I can locate a normal non-laptop monitor to calibrate to test the Spyder unit.
Thank you for the suggestion! :D

 

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9 hours ago, Schwpz said:

Do you know how I can do that? I can't seem to locate that option anywhere, and Google seems out of ideas as well.

Prior calibrating the Spyder 5 Pro only gives me the choice between a desktop and a laptop display type. I can't seem to find any other display options anywhere.
I have admittedly chosen the laptop option every time. I'll try running a full calibration with the desktop option and see if it changes anything!

Oh!  *slaps forehead*  You're right!!!!!  They removed that option in the Spyder 5, sadly.  It was always an option in the earlier versions.

Gee, this might be a deal-breaker.

Do you happen to have original comprehensive paperwork or specifications that came with your computer when you bought it?  Something that might tell us for sure whether it's an LED screen or not?

9 hours ago, Schwpz said:

I have not tried the Spyder calibration on another computer so I cannot exclude a faulty component. I only have access to another laptop, my husband's, and since I'm obviously not really sure of what I'm doing, I haven't dared to try calibrating it out of risk of messing up his laptop as well. That, plus the fact that my husband has already threatened to charge a steep beer fee for every day his laptop might display his favorite Football Manager team's color out of whack :P

This however is an excellent point. I'll try and see if I can locate a normal non-laptop monitor to calibrate to test the Spyder unit.
Thank you for the suggestion! :D

Husbands need to know their place :D  Don't worry, you can't cause any permanent harm to his laptop, I'll help you undo the calibration if needed.  Is his laptop newer than yours?

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23 hours ago, Damien Symonds said:

Do you happen to have original comprehensive paperwork or specifications that came with your computer when you bought it?  Something that might tell us for sure whether it's an LED screen or not?

Hmmm good question. I'll dive in and see what I can dig out!

 

 

23 hours ago, Damien Symonds said:

Husbands need to know their place :D  Don't worry, you can't cause any permanent harm to his laptop, I'll help you undo the calibration if needed.  Is his laptop newer than yours?

Hehe! :))
His laptop is not very much newer, but a little. Need to order some prints first then, as we don't have any from his laptop.

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20 hours ago, Damien Symonds said:

No no no!!!!!  It doesn't matter which computer the prints came from!!!  Not a bit.

You just have to have the prints in your hand, and their files on the screen.

Ofc, duh! *face palm* Sorry, had a brain dead moment there. I knew I should have had that nap T_____T

I had yet another go at it today and I'm starting to suspect it might be an issue with the ambient light after all, despite my previous assumptions.

Today marks a week without any photography work and I'm starting to develop withdrawal symptoms. So to avoid nursing further a photography depression I had my heart set on manually adjust the screen colors in the Graphics Panel eyeballed after the prints in attempt to get at least a somewhat usable laptop. Far from ideal, I know, but I'm starting to get desperate. ^^;

I placed my laptop in a room with a window with daylight on an overcast light snowy day and made some manual adjustments to the screen settings while looking at various prints. The screen was too green, so toning down the green and upping the red a bit gave some nice results. Once satisfied I turned on a light next to the laptop with a 6500K cold white bulb. I had to make some minor adjustments, but nothing too big. I then turned the blinds on and kept the light so the lamp and laptop became the only light sources and tweaked things further. There was an apparent similarity to most of the prints and the screen. Satisfied, I moved to another room with an identical window facing the same direction to double check that everything was in order. Here I discovered that the prints where much redder than in the other room. Tweaked for it, then I turned on the white ceiling lights (don't remember the exact kelvins, but should be around 6500 or so), and here my prints became yellow and my screen blue! The same screen which I've ranted about for days for being too yellow now looked ice cold compared to my prints! Tweaked some more, now without any trace of confidence left, and then pulled down the blinds keeping just the ceiling lights. The prints changed color once again T____T

In retrospective I now realize as I'm writing this post that the first room has blue walls and white furniture, while the other room is packed with warm wooden furnitures. No wonder one room made the prints appear cool and the other set them on fire. But the ambient light seemed to bright and white in both places. There was so nice, not too dominant, but still bright natural light that filed both rooms. I'm amazed and frankly almost offended at how these subtle things can have such a huge impact on this issue.

I read your article about ambient light and I thought I got it. Obviously I didn't.

I feel like a complete idiot, yet I honestly don't know what I need to do to assure that the colors displayed on my screen looks even remotely in sync with the rest of the world.
I'm at the point where I don't even care what my screen looks like as long as it adheres to some standard of some sort and I can get back to playing with my photographs. The only thing I take from this is that under no occasion did any of my screen calibrations ever match my prints without manual tweaks in the graphic card panel, and that there isn't a single place in my house where my prints looks like my monitor.

How in the world did I get tangled up in this mess?! D:

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3 hours ago, Schwpz said:

I honestly don't know what I need to do to assure that the colors displayed on my screen looks even remotely in sync with the rest of the world.

Yes, I realise this is difficult - impossible, in fact - to be sure.

All you can do is choose a space for editing that has nice neutral surrounds, and nice similar-to-daylight lighting.

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I haven't been able to calibrate my husband's laptop yet, but I noticed there's a huge difference in the way image files are displayed in various programs on my laptop.
The windows wallpaper, windows folders and windows photos will show images in a bleak, orangy way, while firefox, photoshop, and windows photo gallery will show the same image very saturated in comparision.
I can live with the color difference, but I need to know which one is most likely the most correct (calibrated) one ^^;

All image files show the sRGB IEC1966-2.1 (8bpc) under the document profile in Photoshop. I followed your tutorial and made sure to change the Color Settings in Photoshop to North America General Purpose 2. The "ICC Profile: sRGB"-checkbox is ticked upon saving image files in Photoshop.

The jpg files are all listed as "sRGB IEC61966-2.1" under "Color Profile" in Adobe Bridge.

The Advanced display settings in Windows 10 show my chosen color profile as default.
The "Use Windows display calibration"-box under the "Advanced" tab is ticked.
Could it perhaps be from the other settings in the Advanced tab?
Under Windows Color System Defaults the Device profile is set to "System default (sRGB IEC61966-2.1) and viewing conditions profile "System default (WCS profile for sRBG viewing conditions). I tried the different options there, but I couldn't see any difference when I changed them. Do you happen to know if these are suitable settings or if they should be changed?

And do you perhaps have any suggestions to where it might be best to look to solve this?

Thank you so much for your infinite patience with my calibration problems!
I hope you had an awesome weekend :)

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Nice desktop screen is definitely on top of my wish list!! ^^;

if you were to guess based upon your experience, which of the two colored versions would you assume is the non-colour-managed one? The one showed on the desktop or the one shown in Photoshop?

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And suddenly I feel 10kg lighter!!! xD
I have been working on some images these last few days and I feared everything I had done in Photoshop up til now was completely off track. THANK YOU!!
I can live with a moody windows 10 as long things are somewhat OK in Photoshop, at least until I can save enough money to buy some more appropriate equipment.

Again, thank you so much for your time and for your expertise! ^_^

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