Jump to content

Separate Calibration Profiles for Laptop and Monitor


Recommended Posts

Just ran into an interesting "problem".

I edit my images using my laptop as the CPU and an external monitor that I had calibrated according to your instructions. For the most part, everything looks great. (There are separate issues that are better addressed later and under a different topic thread.)

However, I have to do digital reveals and my laptop was not calibrated properly. The images look too bright and washed out. (It's very difficult for clients to imagine better colors and brightness.) So, in a cheerful fashion, I calibrated the laptop. Bingo! The images look like they're supposed to. Lovely colors and not washed out. Yaaaaaay!

Then, just for kicks, I opened the files after switching back to the external monitor. Ick. Horrid, yellowy cast. Booooooo!

Now, both ColorMunki profiles are saved (under different names) on the laptop's hard drive. Am I correct in assuming that I shall have to switch back and forth between the profiles, depending upon whether or not I'm editing at home, or showing images to the client?....At least, until I can afford a stationary, dedicated CPU for the external monitor.....

Thanks!

Edited by LSSmith
typos
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

On 5/13/2017 at 4:33 PM, Damien Symonds said:

No, you really shouldn't have to do this.  How old is your laptop?

Basic Info:

I purchased both my laptop and monitor at the end of 2015. The laptop is an "HP zBook 15".  I upgraded its RAM capabilities at that time. My monitor is an "HP 24 z24X Dreamcolor LED backlit professional IPS LCD Display". 

(Sorry for the huge first file. I forgot to resize before posting and I couldn't figure out how to delete it from the post.)

Addendum to calibration problem: I had thought that the ColorMunki calibrator stored the saved profiles somewhere on my hard drives (either the C [laptop] or the G [external hard drive]). I searched both, this morning, and couldn't find anything that looked like the saved profiles. I had hoped to switch the external monitor back to the original profile settings, so that I could do the final retouching on client images. EEEEEEEeeeeeek! (I did not have the ColorMunki connected to my laptop when I did the search. I will try again, with the darned thing plugged in.)

If I have to re-profile the monitor, I'll do it, because I have to finish the job for the client. I was just reaaaaaaalllllllyyyyyyy hoping that it would be a matter of switching between saved profiles.

If, in order to solve this problem, I need to look for files, please do NOT assume that I'm computer literate. I'm not. Please do not skip steps. Detailed instructions and labeled drawings are most appreciated. (I've barely graduated from tallow candles to whale-oil lamps, in terms of technology. Please revisit my favorite quote from the Harry Potter novels, if you have any doubts about my fear/distrust of technology. *siiiiiigh*)

Thanks, in advance, for your help.

 

Workstation set up.jpg

Workstation set up_modified.jpg

Display Settings for 2 screens_modified.jpg

laptop only screen_modified.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, LSSmith said:

If I have to re-profile the monitor, I'll do it, because I have to finish the job for the client. I was just reaaaaaaalllllllyyyyyyy hoping that it would be a matter of switching between saved profiles.

You can, don't worry.  You just have to use the little "DisplayProfile" app that I explained in this article.  (You don't even need the whole "TOGGLE.icc" business, just the app.)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Damien Symonds said:

You can, don't worry.  You just have to use the little "DisplayProfile" app that I explained in this article.  (You don't even need the whole "TOGGLE.icc" business, just the app.)

To make sure that I understand you correctly, all I have to do is to unzip the xrite file, run it (paying attention to click on only asterisked profiles), and I should be good to go? I do NOT need the TOGGLE.icc

As a side note, I have noticed that my laptop screen does seem to have reverted back to it's original, bluish tinge. I'll double check it, tomorrow, once I'm back at my workstation. (I had to abandon ship due to an area outage for the phone/internet lines. One of the few drawbacks to living in rural Georgia!)  I'll let you know how it goes.

In the meantime, thank you so much!

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The little app should show the correct profile highlighted for the screen that it's on.  So if you have its window on the laptop screen, it should have the laptop's profile highlighted.  Then when you move it to the desktop screen (and drop it there) it should switch to highlighting the desktop's profile.

Does it do that?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, Damien Symonds said:

The little app should show the correct profile highlighted for the screen that it's on.  So if you have its window on the laptop screen, it should have the laptop's profile highlighted.  Then when you move it to the desktop screen (and drop it there) it should switch to highlighting the desktop's profile.

Does it do that?

I just tested it on my laptop and it worked like a charm. I'll test it on my external monitor, tomorrow morning (5/16/2017, Eastern Time), when I'm back home.

The true test will be whether or not the images look like they're supposed to.

Thank you! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Damien Symonds said:

Well, that's a test of the calibration itself, not of your computer's profile handling.

*pondering*

Perhaps it would be more accurate to say that if the images are not bright and washed out on the laptop screen and look like they're supposed to on the external monitor, then I will have successfully managed to switch from profile to profile? *hopeful grin*

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yaaaay! I have learned something new. According to my great-grandmother, that means that my day has not been wasted!

In all honesty, I am both flabbergasted by and grateful for all that I've learned from you. Time to take the Levels class and the Sharpening class. :)

Edited by LSSmith
lost my English grammar wits
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/18/2017 at 11:44 PM, Damien Symonds said:

Not relevant to this thread, but really important:  I'm just looking at the files you sent me, and they're not tagged!!!!

Always make sure you save the profile every time you save a photo, no matter what the purpose.

profile2.png.1798bfe69959222f156466ee3529ad64.pngprofile1.thumb.png.82e9106c6660d9e7ebd3f02442457fa4.png

Good morning, Damien!

Sorry for the delay in responding to this post. I looked up embedding color profiles under your "all content" but found no explanation of why it's so important, only that it's a "must do" kind of thing. (I made the colossal mistake of looking for the reason on the internet, and found myself face-to-face with technical explanations that hurt my brain.)

So, why is tagging the photo so important? What does embedding the profile do? How does this benefit me?

Thanks! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Damien Symonds said:

What?

So that browsers display your photos' colours properly, of course!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

And so that printers print them properly.

 

1 hour ago, Damien Symonds said:

The profile is the instructions for how an image is to display.

Saving an untagged image is like giving someone an Ikea flat pack without the instructions. They'll have a go, but if they mess it up, it's your fault not theirs.

Well, that's good to know! No one has ever explained that before. I don't recall any word in the two classes that I've taken so far, that mentions tagging files as part of the workflow when saving an image. (Another reason to go back through the lessons.) If I don't know to do something, I'm unlikely to do it on purpose.

Welcome to the wonderful world of assuming facts not in evidence. I had no idea that I was supposed to embed the profile. And, because I did not know it, and because some aberration is expected when looking at an image on different devices, I chalked up the variations to equipment, not to the files.

One of the reasons that I'm taking your classes is that I lack fundamental knowledge of Photoshop and its capabilities.  Just because I use it, does not mean that I understand it. Worse, I don't know how much I don't know, nor which of the things I don't know is actually critical to know.

Up until your classes, I did enough to get by, but I had reached a point where what I saw in the camera is not what I was getting on the screen, and certainly not what I wanted to give to a client or post on my site. I knew that I wasn't getting the results that I wanted, but I had no idea what questions to ask to begin learning what I needed to know. It's like what I pointed out in my email to you: If I don't know that I've made a mistake, no amount of practicing is going to correct it.

Thank you for explaining why tagging/embedding the color profile is an important part of the process from raw file to finished image.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...