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Damien Symonds

i1Studio-M06

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Calibration settings

This screen is the hub of the whole operation:

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Display and Technology Type

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It's really important to choose the correct setting here.  The trouble is, it's not always easy to do so!

At this point, you might need to dig around in your filing cabinet to consult the invoice or paperwork that came with your computer, to find out whether you have an LED screen or not. X-Rite told me that their software sometimes knows what screen type you have, but it doesn’t always get it right (in fact, it got it wrong for me when recording this tutorial) so always check for yourself, and be sure you’ve made the best selection from this list:

  • Generic: Choose this one if you really don’t know what type of display you have. Needless to say, this is not preferable.
  • CCFL: This basically means ” not LED”. The older your screen is, the more chance it’s CCFL.  But since 2012 or so, most new screens have been White LED.
  • Wide Gamut CCFL: Once again, if your screen is older, and if it was very expensive at the time, it might be wide-gamut CCFL.  But these screens are somewhat uncommon now.
    (Please don’t mix up wide gamut with wide format. Wide format screens are … y’know, wide. 16:9 shape, or whatever. “Wide Gamut” refers to the range of colours they can show. If the salesman boasted to you about a “110% gamut” or “Adobe RGB gamut” screen, it means wide-gamut.)
  • White LED: This is the most common type of modern screens. If you know your screen is LED, it’s almost certainly white LED.
  • RGB LED / OLED / Plasma / GB-LED / PFS Phosphor: I’m not aware of many monitors using these technologies right now, but again, check your screen’s specs carefully.
  • Projector: This tutorial doesn’t cover projector calibration, sorry.

More settings >>

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Is is safe to assume this means white LED?? (Lenovo Yoga 7i intel core i5):

  • Display Type: 15.6″ FHD (1920 x 1080) IPS, glossy, touchscreen with Dolby Vision™, HDR 400, 500 nits
  • Enjoy vibrant FHD visuals on a 15.6 inch up to VESA400 HDR display featuring 100% SRGB color accuracy. Optimized with Dolby Vision and Intel Iris Xe graphics, your visuals will pop. 

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2 minutes ago, AmandaNicole said:

Is is safe to assume this means white LED?? (Lenovo Yoga 7i intel core i5):

  • Display Type: 15.6″ FHD (1920 x 1080) IPS, glossy, touchscreen with Dolby Vision™, HDR 400, 500 nits
  • Enjoy vibrant FHD visuals on a 15.6 inch up to VESA400 HDR display featuring 100% SRGB color accuracy. Optimized with Dolby Vision and Intel Iris Xe graphics, your visuals will pop. 

I think White LED, yes.

Before you proceed any further, could you dig around and find the controls for the HDR feature, and turn that awful thing off?  It's terrible for calibration.

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Hi, thanks so much for this tutorial Damien. 

I am working with a 2018 MacBook Pro and I have the ColorMunki xRite Display system. 

As I follow along, I see that I'm not given the option for display type...I don't see the White LED etc option. Help.

Screen Shot 2021-09-23 at 10.55.15 AM.png

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Oops. Never mind. I figured it out. Palm to face. 

  • Haha 1

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